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3 Ways to Chase Away Winter Blues with Ceramic Flower Pots

How do you get rid of wintertime blues? Sunlamps, bright colors, and warm cups of hot chocolate are some favored approaches, as is sprucing up indoor greenery to give your eyes a break from the dreary greys that dominate this time of year. Here are 3 easy ways to refresh your home for 2014 using plants and planters:

blue and white planter

1. Fill up your windows with greenery.

Chase the winter blues away by accenting your home with chic blue and white ceramic flower pots or large planters and window boxes. If you don’t already have blooming indoor plants, add color with ferns, coleus, or forced white azaleas and hydrangeas. Their delicate snowball-like bloom fits the season perfectly. Plants that get western light tend to fare better in the winter, so go all out in your west-facing windows.

2. Tuck plants into unexpected places.

Does your bathroom get any good natural light? Add aloes, bromeliads, and orchids (plants that all love humidity) to countertops, shelves, or by the tub.

bathroom plants
Try air plants if there’s not a good place for a blue and white ceramic flower pot filled; they often just need daily misting. For living or dining rooms, add unexpected greenery by training your favorite vine around the top of the room’s walls. Kitchen windows, breakfast nooks, and bedrooms are also ideal places to add a blue and white planter filled with lush greens.

3. Focus on entry spaces.

blue_and_white
The weather outside is frightful, but a sheltered porch or entryway is a good place to add some color and texture with hearty plants. Decorative grasses, camellias, winterberries, even ornamental kales work wonders placed in blue and white ceramic flower pots. Complimentary colored planters will make your plants really stand out from the dull landscape around you, cheerfully welcoming anyone who comes to your home.

Do you have favorite winter plants? Other ways to chase away the winter blues? Share them in a comment below!

camellias

Bathtub plants image courtesy JohnHedtke.

Camellias image courtesy Jocey K.

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Blue and White Planters: Fashionable Chic for Your Plants

Trend alert! Indigo is back (did it ever really leave?) as a color for inside the home. Elle Decor’s roundup of these blue home accessories highlights lots of blue and white for everything from rugs to walls to plates. Timeless chic indeed.

blue and white planterBut why should your table have all the fun? Accessorizing your houseplants can be another blue and white plantereasy way to freshen up a room. The simplest solution is to hide terracotta pots in cachepots or another more decorated planter. So bring on the blue and white planters for a stylish update for your favorite ferns and flowers, both indoors and outside.

Of course, not all blue and white planters are fashion-forward. Graphic prints like chevrons or stripes are playful and bold. More intricate patterning adds subtle sophistication. There’s also the option of mixing different solid colored planters together to make your own blue and white display in a window or on a patio. The blue planters by Richard Esteban embody quintessential French charm and look stunning paired with the designs of the Mexican artists at Talavera Vazquez. Voilà: globe-trotting, fashionable plants.

 

 

 

 

teal blue planter

But don’t limit yourself to to flat surfaces. Pottery wall planters help take your color scheme up, up, up; use them to accessorize any outdoor space with fashionable results. And for those of you with a black thumb, don’t despair: blue and white vases are the perfect home for a weekly bouquet, adding a green note that doesn’t need to last and last.

zigzag blue and white planter

How do you feel about indigo as décor? What do you put in your blue and white planters? Have tips for the best plants for pottery wall planters? Leave a comment and let us know; then make sure to check out our blue and white board on Pinterest.

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Favorite DIY Utensil Holder Ideas that Look Fabulous

Utensil holders are strangely versatile additions to a kitchen. Large ones keep kitchen utensils in order for baking and cooking, but also can double as vases or wine bottle holders (if the shape is right). Smaller utensil holders corral silverware for parties or in apartments with little drawer space. Style comes into the kitchen with chevron utensil holders and other contemporary designs. Inspired by the many ideas on Pinterest and crafty blogs, here are some great holders for your home DIY needs.

utensil holder

Holders for Cutlery

The easiest small utensil holder is a jar of appropriate size. Dress it up with ribbon or decals. This series of three mason jars attached to reclaimed barn wood is perfect for forks, knives, and spoons and more! I love this idea for a small herb garden that mounts on the wall.

DIY utensil holder

In the garden theme, small painted flower pots also are great DIY holders for an informal party setting. The tags on these add the perfect touch for a bbq or outdoor event.

flower pot utensil holders

Another variation on this theme is to use three tin cans covered in colorful paper. One Creative Momma’s colorful DIY holders are playful and stylish.

You also can make utensil holders for individual servings, showing off your craft genius at the table. This tutorial by House of Rose is fun for picnics or the beach, dressing up plastic utensils with pizzaz.

DIY utensil holder

Holders for Large Kitchen Utensils

Canisters that won’t tip over are essential for these kitchen accessories. You can simply upcycle a large tin, making sure the edges are crimped down for safety. I love the look of a decorated olive oil tin, though large European cookie tins are another possibility.

DIY olive oil tin utensil holder

Another large-format DIY holder is a paint can, decorated to match your other kitchen accessories. This version is painted with chalkboard paint, allowing for quick customization.

DIY holder

You can also avoid a utensil holder all together, going for a hanging bar over the counter or stovetop. This creative solution from Release Me Create uses a tension bar over the stove for quick installation.

DIY hanging utensil holder

Chevron remains a favorite pattern, so why not paint a large flower pot to create a chevron utensil holder? This Full Life transforms a yellow pot with painter’s tape and spray paint, creating a particularly spiky design. Don’t feel like painting? Then check out Talavera Vazquez’s handpainted chevron utensil holder in solid ceramic. Bonus: It also doubles a wine bottle holder.

chevron utensil holder

What are your favorite places to find DIY projects for the home? What other creative DIY utensil holder ideas have you used? Leave a comment below and let us know!

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How Does Your Garden Grow? With Outdoor Pots of All Sizes, That’s How

ceramic pots for plantsJuly is truly summer: hot days and nights, Fourth of July, picnics, grilling… what is there not to love? Warm evenings (for those of us outside of San Francisco at least) lend themselves to outdoor lounging and dining, enjoying garden-ripened fruits and vegetables right next to where they grow.

Planters are the perfect way to spruce up any outdoor space, whether that means housing ferns or tomato plants with style. Ceramic pots for plants are considered the best since the clay body keeps in the moisture longer, helping plants stay cool in the hot, hot heat. Outdoor pots come in a variety of shapes and sizes, from small flower pots to massive planters like those made by Poterie Ravel that can hold entire trees. The key for making your planters look great? Mixing and matching planter shapes and sizes. Here are my three top tips for getting the most out of your planters on your porch, patio, or out in the garden.

1. Pick planters with your plants in mind. A single pansy will look dwarfed by a large flower pot while a small flower pot doesn’t give the roots of a larger plant enough room to grow. If you’re wanting to make a mini garden, an oval or rectangle planter can be a good choice with enough space for multiple plants. Hanging planters are excellent for vines or even strawberries, adding color and interest to your walls as well.

large blue and white striped planter

2. Mix colors and patterns. Uniform brown planters can get a little old. Add a zig zag planter in ceramic and suddenly your plants pop. Think of planters like cushions in your living room; keep the colors or patterns related and then mix things up to your heart’s delight. Greens, yellows, and blues all compliment most flowers and plants while black and white planters add some modern chic indoors or out. Ceramic pots for plants do well outside or inside, dressing up plants in your garden as well as your living space.

Poterie Ravel French ceramic planters

small flower pot

3. Clusters look better than rows. A line of clay flower pots looks a bit flat, so move pots together in a mix of heights and widths for a more visually interesting display. Anchor your arrangements around a larger and taller pot, grouping smaller planters around it in a mix of shapes. Fill the larger pot with tall plants, leaving low lying greenery for the smaller plant containers. I love how the round zig zag planter looks with small polka dot pots or the square black and white striped planter with a patterned oval planter or two nearby.

polka dot planter

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Ready for Spring? Tips and Tricks to Fill Your Planters

The groundhog said that we’ll have an early spring this year… Given the blizzards and storms across the country, I think it’s about time for some good news! Spring doesn’t just mean warmer temperatures and a lack of snow (admittedly not something we worry much about here in San Francisco); it’s also a time to think about your garden and this year’s planting. Inspired by this article in the New York Times about Tovah Martin’s amazing houseplants (she has over 200 in her home), here are some tips for getting your 2013 garden started early and using fun accents like zig zag planters to banish winter blues in the meantime.

wall planter

  • Italian PlanterGo west! Sunlight exposure for plants can make a huge difference. In the winter, put your ceramic planters where they’ll get western light, not eastern.
  • Stay moisturized. Dry air is another enemy of indoor plants. A humidifier can keep even the most delicate blooms happy and healthy until it’s warm enough to put your favorites outside. Watering frequency is also key – every plant is different. Ferns love moisture while begonias and geraniums like to dry out before a thorough soaking. If leaves start to fall off, chances are you’ve let your plant dry out for too long.
  • Pick the right pots. I agree with Tovah that, “Even the most boring supermarket plant can look great, by giving it a smart pot.” Blue and white planters in a variety of patterns make for stylish arrangements indoors or out. Graphic additions like a zig zag planter or the intricate details of an Italian planter add another splash of color to your greenery or flowering plants, decorating your windows and indoor spaces now. Once things warm up, these ceramic planters move easily to the porch or patio, adding depth to your garden.zig zag planter
  • Acclimate before planting. This time of year you can plant bare root roses, fruit trees, and berry bushes directly in the ground (as long as it’s not frozen). But for other greenhouse-grown plants like a blooming primrose or winter pansy, you’ll need to get your new additions “hardened off” before putting them into their new outdoor homes, explains Marianne Binetti. This means sheltering plants on a porch or other protected area where they can adjust to the cool nights for a week or two. Then fill your window boxes, garden, or outdoor wall planters with some well-deserved color.
  • Be unexpected. If your bathroom gets good natural light, please humidity-loving orchids, aloes, and bromeliads while creating a lush mini-jungle. Colorful Talavera planters that match your décor pull the look together. Another idea? Train plants with vines or tendrils to create a natural curtain in a south-facing window.

Italian planterHow do you use zig zag planters? Have plans for your spring garden or favorite plants for wall planters? Leave a comment and let us know!Italian ceramic planter

Houseplant image courtesy of The Greenery Nursery.

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Warm Up Your Winter Garden with These Hot Outdoor Pots and Plants

Even though it’s January, there’s no reason for your garden to be neglected. Inspired by Sunset Magazine’s tips to refresh a winter garden, here are some ways to keep your garden looking chic all winter long with outdoor pots and more:

Change your color palette

Highlight white blooms and bright green leaves, perhaps with touches of purple or burgundy. If you don’t get snow in your area, this is a way to stay seasonal and fresh at the same time. Accent your white blooms with white cushions on patio furniture, giving the garden a serene look as it prepares for the colors of spring.

Get creative with greenery

Ferns are not the only answer to your greenery needs. Grasses are another hearty option, or try something interesting like this fiber optics plant in a zig zag ceramic planter. Coleus plants with their wide variety of colors and patterns are another creative greenery choice for your ceramic pots for plants indoors or out.

Accent your entryway

Nothing says welcome quite like a door flanked by pots and tall plants. Spiky or fountain-like shapes draw the eyes, particularly when in striking outdoor plant containers. Layer in low growing plants around the rim for a stacked effect that’s particularly eye-catching.

Bring plants inside

Fill your windowsills with greenery (particularly if you don’t have an outdoor garden of your own). Not only does this chase the winter blues away, you can also accent your home with chic black and white planters or cleverly designed small flower pots. Another idea: fill large flower pots indoors with white azaleas and hydrangeas forced into bloom; they look like delicate snowballs.

Group pots on a doorstep

Instead of a formal style door flanking, a small cluster of large and small flower pots dress up any porch or doorstep. A mix of patterns – zig zag planters, ceramic striped outdoor pots, and plain clay flower pots – filled with an interesting plants like purple kale and crimson ‘Fire Power’ nandina makes for a colorful homage to the season.

How do you warm up your winter garden? Have any tips for using outdoor pots or ceramic zig zag planters? Leave a comment and let us know!

Narcissus image courtesy of nosha.

Coleus image courtesy of Pharaoh Hound.

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Behind the Scenes: French Ceramics at Poterie Ravel

One of my favorite parts about my four years with Emilia Ceramics has been developing a rapport with ceramic artists all around the world. In this series of posts, I’ll give some insights into what happens behind the scenes to make these beautiful hand-painted ceramics come to life.

The most recent addition to the Emilia Ceramics collection, Poterie Ravel has been around since 1837. A fifth-generation family-run business, this French ceramics studio was founded in Aubugne, France, and made tiles and other terracotta products for the home. When Gilbert Ravel took over the studio from his father in 1935, he changed the direction of the company to make planters that had more modern designs. The focus moved to high-end interior and landscape designers; the result is a world-class workshop full of ceramic artists that handle 8 tons of product a day, most of it creating their famous large-scale pots. The next time you see a giant terracotta planter at a major hotel, airport, or other public place, look and see if you can find the Poterie Ravel logo – chances are you’ll find one.

Today two sisters, Marion and Julie Ravel, run Poterie Ravel. Their ceramics are definitely art, a process that begins with the clay itself, which is extracted from their own quarries. Small pots are thrown entirely by hand (including all the French ceramics in my collection), while the massive planters are molded by a ceramic artist using a plaster mold and a piece of wood. All the pieces big and small are finished by hand for a smooth surface and the terracotta pieces left unglazed. Other pieces, like the unique pitcher vases, platters, and serving bowls, are hand painted in vibrant natural glazes before being fired in one of their four gas ovens.

About 20 ceramic artists work at Poterie Ravel, including Etienne (pictured below) and Gil, who I met on my last buying trip to France.

One of my favorite parts about Ravel’s French ceramics is that every piece is stamped with the Ravel logo, date, and initials of the artist. After I had made my selections of these French ceramics, I found out that Etienne had made some of the platters, Gil some of the pitchers. I love how each piece tells a story; this kind of personal connection is definitely one of my favorite parts of working with local ceramic artists.

Poterie Ravel is one of the oldest ceramic studios in France, and the attention to detail is truly incredible. Anyone looking for centerpiece ideas needs look no further than one of their unique bowls or statement-making pitchers and vases. It took me four years to be able to offer their French ceramics as part of the Emilia Ceramics collection and I think it was certainly worth the wait!

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Using Ceramic Planters for Curb Appeal and More

What are your favorite ceramic planters like? Round or rectangular? Deep or shallow? Do you keep the same plants in them year round or switch out annuals for an ever-changing display? Are your planters indoor or outdoor? Large or small? Just like any other home accent piece, there are pottery planters out there to fit every style and planting need. In fact, there are so many choices that it can be easy to get overwhelmed – do you want a zig zag planter or striped planter? Planters that are big enough for an entire miniature garden or just one plant? Sometimes it’s hard to know where exactly to begin.

With the coming of fall, planters are a way to keep plants growing just a little longer or even throughout the winter, depending on how hardy they are. Whether or not in ceramic planters, there are many plants and flowers that thrive during the autumn months. Verbena will continue to flower even after a frost, sage and lambs ear make great centerpieces of a mixed planter, and decorative cabbage are totally stylish with their greens, pinks, and purples. An arrangement of pottery planters on your porch filled with flowers or greenery definitely adds a warming touch to any home, amping up its curb appeal.

Last fall I was traveling in France and remember being amazed by all the ceramic planters I saw in both city and countryside. A building with cascading flowers at every window seems so much more inviting than one that’s just plain and stark. Poterie Ravel, my newest French artist, is famous for their large planters in ceramic, some plain terracotta and others glazed.

The wall planters by Richard Esteban echo this French country aesthetic; I love the exposed clay and how it contrasts with the glazed body of these planters. They look fantastic filled with ivy or other cascading plants on the wall of a porch or patio.

If French country isn’t to your taste, try the graphic appeal of a zig zag planter with bold lines in black and white. Check out this fall plant combination, which would look stunning in the round zig zag planter by Talavera Vazquez. The striped ceramic planters are another variation with a modern feel perfect for your favorite fall blooms.

Of course, ceramic planters are ideal for indoor greenery as well. A kitchen herb garden fits nicely into an oval planter like this one with blue and white stripes; other pottery planters house ferns, orchids, and other plants year round.

Whether indoors or out, what are your favorite ceramic planters? Leave a comment and let us know!

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New Arrivals of Old Friends: Ceramic ZigZag Planters Have Returned!

There’s nothing better than getting a shipment of ceramics from one of our artists. I always feel like a kid on Christmas when the boxes arrive and pieces need to be unwrapped and sorted. While it’s great to see the new pieces (like the gray and yellow zig zag tibors), it’s also lovely to replenish my stock of sold out ceramics like the zig zag planters by Talavera Vazquez.

But why is it that ceramic pots for plants remain such constant top sellers? Marla Hart at Studio City Patch explains it neatly in admitting to her addiction to outdoor pots. I think she’s right when gushing about how easy ceramic pots for plants make gardening: you can have a single large flower pot or a whole yard’s worth, whatever your green thumb desires (and can handle). Groupings of small flower pots on a porch or patio add interest and color; large flower pots can even accommodate small trees and bushes that you can later move if you decide to change your landscaping.

Outdoor plant containers are also a good idea for drought conditions like many people are experiencing across the country this summer. You can carefully monitor the dryness of the soil and water your plants without waste; ceramic pots for plants that are glazed in white or other light colors help reflect the sun’s rays and keep those roots from crisping. Because outdoor pots can be easily moved, it also means you can keep delicate plants in the shade during heat waves.

The ceramic zig zag planters are a fun way to keep your plants looking good; either plant directly inside (there’s a hole for drainage) or use these pots to hold another, smaller terracotta pot. The fluting at the top of these zig zag planters makes them perfect for ferns, spider plants, and flowers that like to spill over the sides.

The new sunflower planter also from Vazquez has the same shape; I think this large flower pot looks splendid filled or empty. Other new arrivals include the small flower pot with polka dots and another ceramic pot in lime green by Richard Esteban. Both of these planters are one of a kind and would look great in a window indoors or outdoors.

Richard Esteban’s clay flower pots with exposed bases are another way to add French provincial charm to your favorite plants. Of course, there are still the large flower pots with stripes by Vazquez and wonderful large flower pots with fruit motifs from Tuscia d’Arte.

With all the planters I now have on hand, I keep thinking about expanding my own gardening efforts. I might be on my way to becoming addicted to outdoor plant containers and flower pots myself!

Shop our entire selection of planters here. 

 

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Decorative Pottery for Your May Flowers: More than Just French Ceramics

The saying goes that “April showers bring May flowers,” and with this year’s especially wet spring, the flowers are blooming with abandon! With all that’s growing, it’s the perfect time to get decorative with some flower pots, ceramic planters, and other stylish containment for your favorite blooms. Annie Selke recently tweeted about kicking your spring garden decor up a notch with great planters and I couldn’t agree more. To add to the excitement, the ever-popular Mexican planters by Talavera Vazquez are back in stock. Here are some easy ways to inject decorative pottery style into your home and garden:

Be square.

Just like unusually-shaped plates, a square planter can add a touch of unexpected style. The square hidalgo planter (pictured here on my sister’s patio) is a great example. Black and white, it’s chic and festive at the same time. Besides the square hidalgo planter, striped or zigzag planters are other fun options. Squares don’t have to be big either – this small rustic green planter by Richard Esteban is perfect for a desk, countertop, or perched on a window ledge.

Be French.

French ceramics can transport you to Provence in an instant… And for me, nothing feels as French as ceramic hanging planters, which add green to any wall or lattice and create a stunning outdoor area. This hanging planter with polka dots and squiggles is a fabulous example of decorative French pottery that’s also functional. It reminds me of a party lantern (and who can resist a party?).

I also love the new wall planters by Richard Esteban that I picked out while in Provence last September. Totally rustic and understated, with raw glaze peaking out from under soft, touchable glazes, they don’t compete with beautiful flowers, but add to them. See all three color choices here: Wall Planters.

Be layered.

Raised beds add dimension to any size garden, but why stop there? Use clay flower pots to move plants to unexpected places (and help preserve delicate blooms from the cold when fall comes). Mixing flower pots into beds can be a fun way to use ceramic planters, adding a splash of color that compliments what’s growing inside. I love this large sunflower planter because it adds vibrant Mexican color to the garden or patio. Don’t have a garden or large yard? Cluster different sized pots right next to each other to create a garden of any size, no matter how small.

Be innovative.

Garden décor isn’t just about black and white zigzag planters or ceramic flower pots. Chairs, tables, stepping stones, borders, and other accessories make a huge difference to the space. Lay out paving stones in a spiral to create a unique patio area. Create a wall of succulents if you don’t have any yard to work with. Turn that giant tree stump into a small flower garden. With all the creative ways to use outdoor space, you can make the outside of your home just as special as the inside.
Succulent wall

Have creative gardening ideas or uses for decorative pottery when it comes to plants? Leave a comment and let us know!

Succulent wall image courtesy of Jzawdubya.

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6 Tips for Ceramic Planters this Spring

Spring’s just around the corner and that makes me want to plant some flowers. I love my kitchen garden of herb pots inside, but this time of year, the outdoors beckon. Maybe some large flower pots or outdoor plant containers are in my future. Ceramic planters remain my mainstay when it comes to flower pots and I’m definitely not alone. Here are some tips I’ve gleaned on how to use everything from zig zag planters to outdoor pots to make a great garden anywhere.

  1. Size matters. Small plants work well in small flower pots, but think about growth when deciding what goes where. Roots need enough space to expand or else your plants will become pot-bound and unhappy. Curiously, small flower pots are the perfect choice for orchids – their roots like the restricted space because it mimics their natural environment. This square planter in rustic green is the perfect size for an orchid. Large flower pots on the other hand, can be great for miniature gardens, multiple plants, even small trees or shrubs.
  2. Drainage counts. Along with size, drainage is another factor to keep in mind when choosing ceramic planters. The best options have a hole or two for drainage. Otherwise add a layer of gravel or rocks to prevent roots from staying too wet. Another trick is to hide clay flower pots within ceramic planters, making them easy to remove for watering.
  3. Think about seasons. Try bringing in outdoor pots during cold months to prevent them from freezing, especially if your winters are harsh. Ceramic pots for plants also allow you to move your garden around into shade or sun during growing seasons for the best light.
  4. Style works outside too. Love chevrons? Find zig zag planters for your favorite blooms. Is blue and white your favorite color combination? Indoor or outdoor pots give your greenery a stylish home. I consider ceramic planters yet another opportunity to inject some personality into your environment, whether it’s a patio or kitchen window.
  5. Choose ceramic planters. Clay flower pots keep soil moist longer, so if you forget to water a day or two it’s not the end of the world. The sturdiness of ceramic planters also ensures they won’t tip over easily. Ceramic planters also let you make attractive clusters of plants along flowerbeds, patio sides, or garden paths. Pleasing on the eyes and pleasing for your plants – it’s definitely a win-win.
  6. Go up. Don’t forget to use vertical space with hanging and wall planters, other great choices for outdoor plant containers. From doors to lattice work, these colorful additions brighten any type of outdoor space.

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New Year, New Growth in Ceramic Flower Pots

morning in the garden . . .Happy New Year! It’s the time of year we make optimistic resolutions, invest in new gym memberships and generally pursue good intentions for at least 6 weeks until old habits kick in. Change is good, of course, but drastic and dramatic changes in our daily routine are hard to sustain. So how to make 2012 get off to a fresh start that will actually last past February (and doesn’t involve the gym every 12 hours)?

Changing our environment is a great way to make a sustained impact this year. So think green. Literally. With ceramic flower pots and beautiful plants you can instantly alter your environment, bringing lush vibrancy to any room in the home or even brighten up the office. Decorative pottery is always an easy way to change the tone of a space, so add plants to the mix for a more dynamic personal touch.

If you don’t have a green thumb, don’t worry. “Greenifying” your home doesn’t require extensive gardening knowledge. Start maybe with some bulbs in ceramic flower pots – buy them at your favorite florist while they’re blooming and stick the whole pot into a piece of decorative pottery (like the round Paloma planter).

There are lots of hardy ferns and vines that only need minimal watering and look fantastic in the square hidalgo planter. The black and white is incredibly striking with green.

Succulents are another low-maintenance way to fill ceramic flower pots. An oval planter, round ceramic flower pot, or rectangle shape fits several different plants, creating a miniature garden with cacti, air-plants, aloe, and other curious shapes with names too long for me to remember. I love the air-plants at Paxton Gate here in San Francisco, they can go anywhere from wall to centerpiece.

Plants help filter the air and are cited in studies for everything from helping with fatigue to making people feel happy and focused. If you work in an office, hang this great ceramic planter by Richard Esteban on your cubical or office wall with a cascading vine or lush fern. Or add the square hidalgo planter to a corner of your desk. If your bathroom gets enough light, add a small ceramic flower pot or two there as well for a bit of color in an often lifeless space. Orchids thrive in the humid environment your showers create, making them easy to care for.

No matter what you fill your ceramic flower pots with, here’s to a happy, thriving, and green new year for all!

Plant image courtesy of hortulus.

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Create a Garden Inside and Out with Blue and White Planters

Living in the city as I do, there’s no real space for me to have a garden of my own. At least that’s what I thought. Talking with a friend a few years ago, she pointed out that you don’t need lots of space to have an interior garden; picking up a blue and white planter from the shelf she said that I already had some of the materials right on hand. All I needed were some seedlings, potting soil and I was in business. Since then I’ve expanded my repertoire from a few houseplants to a kitchen herb garden and love having fresh herbs year round.

Even if you have acres for a personal garden space, bringing green into your home is a great way to enliven any decorating scheme. There are hundreds of houseplant ideas if greenery or flowers are your preference. But if you’re like me, a steady supply of fresh herbs is too good to pass up. It makes such a difference when it comes to cooking!

So what to plant? As the song says, parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme are all great for a pot garden. Mint, basil, and dill also look striking in a blue and white planter on a windowsill. You can grow many herbs from seed, but I like starting with seedlings to see immediate progress. Most herbs need a decent amount of sun, so choose a sunny window (even if it’s not in the kitchen) or augment with artificial lighting. Remember to water (but not too much) and you’ll have your favorite seasonings ready to go in just a few months if not sooner.

Have some outdoor space? Why not try a container garden for veggies, fruits, herbs, and/or flowers? There are all kinds of container possibilities, but decorative ceramics, like blue and white planters, remain my favorite. Not only is blue and white ceramic continually appealing, ceramic is also an easy way to keep soil from getting too dry too quickly. What’s also great is that you can bring plants in during the cold winter months, keeping them healthy and happy all-year round. Don’t limit blue and white ceramic to the kitchen; add interest to your patio with decorative hanging blue and white planters (with or without plants) as well as various sized other ceramic planters.

No matter where you have them in your home, blue and white planters will add a unique decorative touch with or without plants. They also make a great housewarming present. Just add seed packets to a blue and white striped oval planter for a fast, easy introduction to pot gardening; no green thumb required.

Pot garden image courtesy of Pete Birkinshaw.

Basil image courtesy of Ryan Hyde.