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Happy Fall from Emilia Ceramics!

I cannot believe it is October already! There’s so much I love about fall – cozy sweaters, rainy days, changing of the leaves, hot chocolate, holiday parties, pumpkin spice, and baking of course! Here at Emilia Ceramics in Boulder, CO, we have many exciting things happening this fall season: We recently imported some amazing new arrivals from Mexico (see a few of my favorites below), plus we have an entire section of the Emilia Ceramics website dedicated to Fall Entertaining Ideas, as well as our usual Holiday Gift Ideas packed with great ceramics to buy for the upcoming season.

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We are also very excited to announce that Emilia Ceramics has been engaging in social outreach to numerous fantastic bloggers, magazines, and interior designers! Make sure to keep your eye out for us, you never know where one of our amazing products might be. Here are some fabulous Emilia Ceramics pieces we have been promoting:

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And with the holiday season quickly approaching, it’s never too early to buy ceramics for all your upcoming parties. Whether for Halloween, Thanksgiving, Day of the Dead, Hanukkah, or Christmas, we have lots of ideas of ceramics to buy for any event. The holidays can be stressful, so get your shopping done early so you can really enjoy them!

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What are you most looking forward to this fall? Will you be buying ceramics or any other home decor pieces for your upcoming holiday parties?

 

 

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Emilia Ceramics Now on #Houzz and #Dominomag

There are few things better than a site full of gorgeous, inspirational home design photos. Houzz is a perpetual favorite and I couldn’t be more excited about the relaunch of Domino. And now, among the photos of fabulous interiors that range from DIY to professionally designed, you’ll find some familiar ceramics. That’s right, Emilia Ceramics is part of the marketplaces for both Houzz and Domino, allowing us to share some of our favorite pieces with a wider audience.Houzz

I’ve long been a fan of Houzz. With all those photos of homes in almost every style imaginable it’s an addictive and informative hub of home décor. I was definitely excited when Houzz reached out to see if Emilia Ceramics would like to be part of their selection of curated products that users can buy directly from the site. The collection features many favorites from our Mexican artists Gorky Gonzalez and Talavera Vazquez, along with Richard Esteban’s fabulous French polka dot mugs.

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polka dot mugs
What’s great about Houzz in particular is that the site suggests wonderful pieces to complete a room, from a garden patio to lux kitchen to cozy living room. It’s ideal for getting a diverse point of view from sources you may have never heard of before.

Domino is another old friend that I’m happy to see again. The magazine’s relaunch in 2013 was met with joy from the design following they had gathered during their initial 2005 to 2009 tenure. Domino’s articles are super informative — think a range from how to throw a cocktail party in an hour to DIY an IKEA staple into a customized wardrobe — and the lists of decorating essentials are definitely drool-worthy. Black and white and chic; I couldn’t agree more!


I also enjoy the new feature that allows you to directly shop pieces from the story, like in this profile of Nick Olsen’s New York apartment. Totally easy, totally brilliant.

The Emilia Ceramics collection at Domino offers a wider range of ceramics from France, Italy, and Mexico. Talavera Vazquez’s small blue striped vase has proved a favorite since being featured in the 2013 holiday issue. As with Houzz, I look forward to seeing photos of how people use these pieces in their own homes. It’s always inspiring!

blue striped vase with flowers

 

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The Ultimate Registry Guide: 5 Things to Not Forget

So you’ve registered with your favorite stores for your upcoming wedding. You’ve figured out the big items that you’d love to receive and are ready to rock… right? Not quite yet. While kitchen appliances and bakeware are the most popular registry items, there are plenty of overlooked items that make great wedding gifts and may have been left off your registry.

Here are my top 5 forgotten things you might just want to include on your wedding registry.

  1. Quality sheets. We all know how important sleep is, so why not use your registry to improve the quality of sleep you get. Find a set in 100 percent Egyptian cotton or 100 percent pima french coffee bowlcotton (known as Suprima) with a 300 thread count minimum. A set (or two) of luxury sheets will have you luxuriating in hotel-worthy comfort. Extra pillow covers are always useful too, so don’t forget to add a few more of those to the list.
  2. Coffee or tea supplies. How do you caffeinate in the morning? French coffee bowls are a fun choice for a gift that’s small and versatile. Like French coffee mugs but bigger, coffee bowls work wonderfully for small servings of soup and cereal. Everyone can use another couple of mugs, particularly for when guests come by. A coffee maker, whether a quality French press or fancy espresso machine, and/or a capacious tea pot are other must-haves.green and white tea pot
  3. More plates and glasses. Even if you only think you need a place setting for eight people, remember that things do break. So ask for others to help you buy ceramics you’ll need in the future, replacing that favorite dish or bowl. No matter if you have a design that’s fine china or handmade ceramic, few designs are produced forever, so stocking up now will pay off in the future. The same is true for glassware, both regular and wine glasses.
  4. Organizers. A spice rack, storage containers, or shelf dividers are definitely items that will see daily use. Use this as an opportunity to streamline the design of your home organization. A quality trash can, set of recycling bins, or garage storage are other useful items that many homes could use.
  5. Home bar accessories. A good corkscrew, wine bottle stoppers, and wine rack are a must for anyone who loves to have a few bottles of wine always on hand. Quality bar tools like a cocktail shaker, muddler, bar spoon, or a good ice bucket make mixed drinks even better. The square ice cube trays are also ideal for anyone who’s looking to take their drinks up a notch; the ice takes longer to melt when it’s in a big square block. And no matter your drink of choice, coasters are another item you never have too many of.

cocktail shakerHave other items you think should be on wedding registries? Do you like to buy ceramics or other daily use items as wedding gifts? Have any items you left off your registry and wish you hadn’t, like French coffee bowls or specialized serving ware? Leave a comment below.

Polka dot bed image courtesy of browndresswithwhitedots via Pinterest.

Cocktail shaker image courtesy of lennox_mcdough.

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From Blue and White Planters to Rustic Pitchers: Our Favorite Registry Picks

I love working with couples on their registries, seeing how excited they get about picking out beautiful ceramics together and then hearing about how they use their pieces after the wedding. Couples like Bethany and Martin use their ceramics daily, whether it’s a vase holding fresh flowers on the kitchen table, a pottery wall planter gracing the back deck, or one of Richard Esteban’s playful polka dot bowls filled with yogurt for breakfast.

blue and white serving bowl
jennie's_gogoAlong the same line, I recently visited my cousin’s house and loved seeing the collection of colorful Gorky mugs and bowls (photo on the right) she received from her Emilia Ceramics Gift Registry. She and her husband use these everyday, thinking of the friends who gave them and the event they celebrated — that’s what I consider the perfect wedding gift!

In recent blog posts, I’ve talked about ideas for where to register as well as unique gifts that people can give a special couple. Today I’m looking at registries from a slightly different angle, diving into the lists of some of the wonderful couples currently registered at Emilia Ceramics.

Sheena and Blake love blue and white as well as statement pieces with Tuscan charm. Their choices of serving platters and a wine bottle holder point to people who love to entertain. Blair and Christopher have a broad ceramic selection that ranges from big to small: an extra large casserole by Richard Esteban, long rooster platter by Gorky Gonzalez, intricate spoon rest, and even a colorful mini plate.

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extra large casserole dishJen and Kristina love rustic white pieces from France and striped planters. The white pitcher below (sorry — it was one-of-a-kind and has already been purchased for them : ) and serving dishes contrast beautifully with the orange and yellow of their other favorite ceramics.

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Most registries contain serving pieces for entertaining – platters, pitchers, bowls – as well as practical statement pieces like vases and utensil holders. For those with a green thumb, a blue and white planter usually is on the list, and if the happy couple has any kind of yard, pottery wall planters as well. And pieces like the Amor platter are perfect for celebrating love. The range of big to small pieces also is perfect for helping guests pick the right gift for their price range.

blue and white planter

What ceramics do you think should be on every registry? Leave a comment and let us know!

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New Showroom in Boulder, CO!

We’re finally open for business — By appointment, 7 days a week. Call or email and then come visit!

2232 Pearl Street
Boulder, CO 80302
Phone: 303.442.0180

It’s been an exciting (and exhausting) summer for Emilia Ceramics. After months of finding the right space, moving hundreds of boxes across country, unpacking, painting, and setting up, we’re ready for visitors! Here’s a photo journal of all the work we’ve done, as well as a little peak at what’s in-store…

May, 3013: My mom and I visited Boulder to find a new location for Emilia Ceramics. After 2 full days of looking at warehouses, shops, and even some dentist offices (which would have required lots of construction), we found the perfect space: 2232 Pearl Street. It’s the green building in the middle. How amazing are the clouds in Boulder?!
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Below: The inside before we moved anything in.

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Of course, before we could make any headway in Colorado, we had to pack up the entire business back in California. Luckily, we had the best 3 packers/movers/helpers imaginable — Thank you Edgar, Thomas, and Estuardo! (If anyone in the Bay Area ever needs any sort of help, from painting and construction to moving, these are your guys. Contact me and I will hook you up!)

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We filled the biggest U-Haul truck there is, a 26 footer! Once full, this truck was expertly driven across 4 states and over some huge mountain passes by the most reliable (and reasonably priced) truck driver I could find: my dad! Miraculously, he arrived in Boulder in one piece and still smiling. IMG_3321IMG_3324
Our next job was unpacking this monstrosity, which proved more difficult than you’d imagine because of how well-packed it was. But “The Brown Family Moving Co.” managed it and pretty soon that nice open space was so filled with boxes you could barely move.

IMG_3337IMG_3368 IMG_3371Somehow, over the last month, we’ve found space for everything. In addition to unpacking, we have painted the inside a soft butter yellow, set up furniture, displayed ceramics representative of all the artists we work with, and most recently, painted the outside of the building a Tuscan yellow with blue trim. Next steps include blue window boxes and a new door to match, plus new Emilia Ceramics signs. Needless to say, it’s been a lot of work… but somehow, it seems to finally be coming together.
IMG_3428IMG_3507IMG_3511Mexican ceramicsMexican ceramicsrooster and owl creamersItalian ceramicsIMG_3557IMG_3558I am so excited to finally be open for business! There’s no way I could have done all of this without the help of my family and friends… most especially my parents who have helped every step of the way. THANK YOU!

So if you’re in the Boulder, Colorado area, please come visit! You can set up an appointment to view the space 7 days a week. Just call — 303.442.0180 — or email me at [email protected].

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The New Home of Emilia Ceramics: Boulder, CO

IMG_3312As I mentioned in my last post, moving a bunch of ceramics is a tough job. I’ve dealt with large orders before, sometimes getting a few different shipments from my artists at the same time. It can get pretty chaotic unpacking, sorting, taking inventory, and photographing all the new pieces. But unpacking a huge moving truck is quite different from a crate or two of ceramics. My team of helpers (pictured on the left) had done such a good job squeezing all the ceramics and furniture into the uHaul that extracting it all from the truck-puzzle took some major effort.

Now that the dust has settled a bit—shelves built and organization well underway—I wanted to share some photos of the new Emilia Ceramics showroom. Building all the shelves needed took more time, but the results are exciting… I am looking forward to being much better organized with a much more streamlined process of fulfilling orders than I ever had in CA. Of course, in a few months I’ll have the addition of all my new pieces from France and Italy to think about, so things are sure to stay exciting!

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Whew. Unlike Emilia Ceramics San Francisco, our new location on Pearl Street in downtown Boulder will be regularly accessible to the public. No more having to wait for the holiday pop-up shop when the desire for gorgeous handmade ceramics strikes! I’m looking forward to decorating my front windows and having a more flexible space instead of the former warehouse.

Having everything in one place should also streamline how quickly new pieces get onto the website once I receive them. Look for some new ceramics to post soon, like yellow chevron lamps by Talavera Vazquez. Their lamps are some of our most popular pieces, so I’m excited to expand the collection to include more colors and sizes.

I should get back to organizing, but look forward to getting settled into my new town after all the unpacking is over. Here’s thinking of you, San Francisco!

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Majolica Madness in Deruta!!

drive_to_derutaAfter a few days in Florence, I was excited to get back to the country. It has been 5 years since I was in Italy last and I had forgotten just how beautiful Tuscany truly is! Especially this time of year — rolling green hills, red poppies everywhere, and little hill towns around every bend in the road. I spent 2 nights in beautiful Montepulciano and then headed even farther south, to the equally beautiful region of Umbria. orvieto_2The most visible difference between Umbria and Tuscany seems to be slightly steeper hills in Umbria… and a different name for the delicious local wine served at restaurants. I was staying in Orvieto, a town known best for its cathedral, its ceramics, and its Classico wine. I was of course there for the ceramics, but I also enjoyed time spent gazing at the cathedral and drinking the Classico.

But back to the real reason I was in Umbria: a visit to Deruta, a small town with a big ceramics industry. There are actually two parts of Deruta: the small old town up on the hill, which is quaint and full of ceramic stores, and the larger “new” area down below, which is a little faster-paced, but also full of ceramic stores (as well as workshops and showrooms). I started my day in the old section, enjoyed a cappuccino on the main square and then strolled around, doing a little window shopping to whet my appetite. Then I ventured down into the more modern town, where I went looking for old acquaintances and new ceramics for the Emilia Ceramics collection.majoliche

My first stop was visiting my uncle’s good friends Silvana and Marcello who have a small ceramics business at the outskirts of town. I interrupted Silvana in the midst of her work and explained in my best Italian: il zio mio e Gifford (my uncle is Gifford), which was all the introduction I needed. We had a fun catch-up session (which was repeated when Marcello arrived a few minutes later) in which I spoke my few words of Italian mixed with much more Spanish and they spoke Italian quickly with lots of hand gesturing to try to make me understand. In the end, Silvana suggested that I go visit a ceramics shop in town that I hadn’t heard of before. She offered to take me and introduce me to the nice people who worked there.

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And that’s how I ended up at Ceramiche Gialletti Giulio, a beautiful shop packed with vases, lamps, plates, clocks, and lots of fun smaller pieces like salt & pepper grinders and oil & vinegar dispensers. I got the royal treatment from Michele—including a tour and explanation of the process (all in amazing English)—and found some great pieces. I am most excited about the colorful, yet sophisticated table settings I am hoping to add to the Emilia Ceramics collection!

My next stop was right nearby — I was meeting with Gerardo Ribigini whose shop Geribi (which I just realized is a combination of his first and last name : ) I visited 5 years ago. I spent quite a while walking around, looking at his beautifully painted pieces and asking about different patterns, styles, shapes, and designs. I’m definitely looking forward to adding some of his skilled work to the collection as well.

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womenThe final place I went in Deruta was another special visit suggested by my uncle Gifford. Over the years that he’s been visiting Deruta, he has befriended Carmen Monotti, an exceptional artist who creates various types of ceramic artwork. My favorites are her recreations of Klimt paintings (on vases, wall-hangings and necklace pendants — photo on the right)… And the tiles she paints, upon request, for the nearby church, La Chiesa Madonna dei Bagni (photo below). When “miracles” happen in peoples’ lives miracles_1(anything from surviving a car crash to having a healthy baby), those touched by the event commission Carmen to make a tile (in Italian called an ex voto) depicting the scene. The ex voto is hung in the church. I LOVE these tiles — there’s something about their soft colors and simplicity that is so charming.

I had a great time hanging out with Carmen, joking about my uncle, discussing my business, and looking at her artwork. On the way out of town I stopped at La Chiesa Madonna dei Bagni. It is a small church, with simple white walls that make the perfect backdrop for the tiles covering every wall. I would have taken more pictures, but my camera had run out of batteries after the long day filled with so many photogenic subjects! Below you’ll see one of Carmen’s most recent tiles that is hung in the church, followed by an older one done by another artist.

I’m off to the Amalfi Coast now for the final leg of my Italian adventure. I’m going to visit Vietri Sul Mare, another ceramic-centric town, where the well-known Ceramica Solimene is located. I’ll keep you posted!

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The Staying Power of Fine Italian Ceramics, Past and Present

Fine Italian ceramics are nothing new. Dating back to the Middle Ages and beginning to flourish in the 1400s, the ceramic centers of Italy have been producing incredibly detailed ceramics for literally hundreds of years. I recently came across a little book discussing Italian and other European ceramics throughout history – Maiolica, Delft and Faïence by Giuseppe Scavizzi – and wanted to share some of its beautiful images with you. Just look at the inside of this “loving cup” from circa 1500 Faenza, used to celebrate engagements or as a gift for a beloved:

fine Italian ceramic loving cup

The detailed likeness is strikingly similar to work by Tuscia d’Arte, such as this Italian canister.

Italian canister

Another timeless piece is this plate of a solider from circa 1630:

Italian soldier plate

He looks so jaunty, reminding me of this contemporary Italian ceramic plate with a drummer at its center.

Italian ceramic plate

Italian ceramicsOne of the amazing things about hand painted Italian pottery is that patterns and techniques have been passed down through generations. Artists today hand paint using the same process as those centuries ago, following traditional patterns as well as adding some contemporary touches. Historically important areas for Italian ceramics have stayed pretty constant throughout the years, many of them in the center of Italy. One is Montelupo Fiorentino, outside of Florence in Tuscany. It’s where I get the fine Italian ceramics for the Emilia Ceramics collection. In a few months I plan to travel to Italy to visit both Tuscia d’Arte and Ceramiche Bartoloni as well as some potential new artists; I can’t wait!

Other famous centers are Deruta, Siena, and Vietri, examples of which are easy to find at Biordi Art Imports, also here in San Francisco. Biordi has a huge selection of typical Italian patterns that go back to the Renaissance; their walls are stuffed with dinnerware, decorative pieces, and exquisite tiles. If you find yourself in North Beach and want to see some Italian ceramics in San Francisco, check Biordi out.

No matter where hand painted Italian pottery comes from, I love how it connects to the artists that create it. Fine Italian ceramics are usually hand signed, a fitting recognition of all the time it takes to paint as well as form these pieces of art. Italian canisters, Italian utensil holders, or dinnerware pieces, these are all ceramics rich in history and tradition that make it easy to bring Italy to your home.Italian hand paintingWhat are your favorite fine Italian ceramics? Any recommendations for places in Italy I should visit this coming summer? Leave a comment and let me know.

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Guest Blogger Bethany: Six Months Later with New Pottery

Martin and I got married this past May and it’s been quite the whirlwind before, during, and since. Our wedding was lovely, filled with laughter, family, and close friends. Getting to Iceland for the honeymoon was fraught with travel delays and missed flights but absolutely worth it in the end. And then we were back home, with a list of thank you notes to write and “normal” life to resume.

Of course, many of my favorite gifts came from our wedding registry at Emilia Ceramics. As I said in my earlier post, figuring out the mysteries of wedding registries was one of the more stressful aspects of getting married. Using the resulting French coffee bowls and other pieces of new pottery, however, is a breeze.

We threw a reception for our San Francisco friends in July and I was incredibly glad to have the platters and bowls for all the food. I think we incorporated almost every new piece of pottery we’d received for the meat, cheese, and desserts to accompany the champagne. The results looked just as good as they tasted and it was a great way to break in our new ceramics.

The best part though is having things we can use everyday. I see the polka dot bowls whenever I open the cabinet and they never fail to make me smile. These hold my yogurt in the morning, soup at lunch, and the occasional (ok, frequent) ice cream sundae as a reward for diligent studying. Even though I’m more of a tea drinker, I still like to use the French coffee bowls when I sit down to write. As a graduate student in English literature and part time writer and editor, having the perfect vessel for my beverage of choice makes all the difference. My favorite bowl has a few drips of glaze inside and they all have subtle variations in the glaze; I love it that each French coffee bowl is truly unique.

Even when we’re not entertaining, we also use the blue and white salad bowl made by Talavera Vazquez to hold fruit on the table. Other serving platters have made appearances at dinner parties and I’m looking forward to the holidays to have even more occasions to use them.

I dropped by the Emilia Ceramics pop-up shop in Palo Alto the other day (when Emily asked if I’d be willing to write a follow-up post) and I fell in love all over again with the polka dot mugs, espresso cups, and other pieces of new pottery on offer there. Even if we’re done with the wedding registry, I already have some ideas what will be on my Christmas list this year!

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Emilia Ceramics Pop-Up Shop 2012 Grand Opening This Weekend

I’m excited to announce the opening of our Palo Alto pop-up shop this Saturday, November 10th. This will be our fourth year with a physical shop for the holidays… and I’d venture to say, it is our best shop yet! The last week has been a flurry of painting, unpacking, and putting the final touches on our new space at Town & Country Village. We’ve already had a number of curious passers-by come in, look around, and tell us they’re anxious for our actual opening day. Personally, I’m looking forward to having everything set up well before Thanksgiving and getting to talk with customers about handmade and handpainted ceramics as they discover the perfect gift for loved ones and themselves.

This year the shop is once again at Town & Country Village in Palo Alto, but we’re now in the beautiful Suite 10, located between Cold Stone Creamery and the UPS Store, across from LuLu’s Mexican Restaurant and Kara’s Cupcakes. I am already enjoying the many delicious offerings of my neighbors! Here’s a map so you can find us.

Starting this weekend, the shop will be open Monday-Saturday, from 10 am to 7 pm and Sunday, from 11 am to 6 pm. Follow us on Facebook or subscribe to the newsletter to find out about upcoming events (we’ll be having a few wine tastings and at least one holiday bash), flash sales, and other fun (like new pieces debuting from Mexico) in the coming weeks. Hope to see you soon!

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Creating Your Wedding Registry: Tricks and Tips

Planning a wedding can be a very stressful time. Even after you choose the time and venue, the seemingly endless list of decisions and wedding ideas continues. What will your invitations look like? How will you decorate? What will people eat? Will there be dancing? Where will you register?Wedding celebration

The wedding registry choice is a tough one for many couples. You want to give your guests options, but not seem greedy. Several of my close friends have gotten married in the past few years and many of them were turned off by the “where to register” recommendations as well as the confusing etiquette surrounding the issue. Still, as a way of protecting yourself from a barrage of questions and worse, receiving tons of gifts you don’t actually want, wedding registries really should alleviate some of the wedding stress.

Getting ready to start the wedding registry process yourself (or know someone who is)?

Here are some tips for making the process streamlined and stress-free for everyone:

  • Make a list before deciding where to register. Sit down with your partner and discuss what things you actually want and need. Maybe you already have six sets of sheets between the two of you, but want a fluffy down duvet or even a new bed. Categorize items by room or type to give a sense of where your desires really lay before any shopping occurs. Ideally you’ll set up your registries 4-6 months before your wedding day, so start this process as soon as possible.
  • Choose a few accessible stores. With your list, figure out two or three stores that fit your needs best; managing ten registries is just asking for added stress! Big box stores and online retailors are popular choices because your guests can find gifts no matter where they live. Many let you set up a wedding registry online and then easily manage it without having to go into the store yourself. But online doesn’t have to equal just blah big box; more and more online stores offer wedding registries (including Emilia Ceramics) so you can still choose your favorite places to shop.
  • Make it personal. Speaking of online, there are websites now that let you create your own centralized wedding registry that draws on items you’ve found at places online. A great new website called Knack Registry is doing just that… stay tuned for Emilia Ceramics to partner with them soon!
  • Ask for what you actually like. Seriously – if you think that vase is ugly now, it’s likely to be even uglier to you in ten years (if you’ve not given it away by then).
  • Have a wide price range for gifts. It’s best to give your guests a wide array of options in terms of gifts. A few expensive items are fine, but strive for balance with more affordable options. For example, instead of a complete set of pots and pans, register for the same items individually to give greater flexibility.
  • Register for enough gifts. Again, options are important. Two to three items per guest can be a good metric, particularly if you have many items under $60 on your wedding registry. Remember, people like having options, and might go in together for expensive items or get you several smaller gifts.
  • Ship items to your house. Simplify what you have to keep track of at the wedding itself (especially if you’re going on your honeymoon directly afterwards) and ask guests to ship items directly to you before or after the ceremony. Many registries even let you put in one address for before the big day and another for after to ensure that gifts don’t go astray.

Have other wedding registry survival tips? Please share them by leaving a comment below.

Champagne image courtesy of siebe.

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Entertaining with Originality

Last weekend I went to Portland to visit some good friends who were actually among the first of the couples to register with Emilia Ceramics about 4 years ago. They have a beautiful house full of all sorts of unique touches, including an extensive collection of Emilia Ceramics. Upon entering the house, you’re immediately greeted by 3 such statement pieces: A colorful zigzag ginger jar by Talavera Vazquez, a one-of-a-kind vase by Capelo (stay tuned, I’m about to receive the Capelo pieces I hand-picked while visiting Mexico in June), and a sophisticated planter by Tuscia. Of course I felt right at home in the midst of all this beautiful ceramics… but the best part was seeing how my friends have made these pieces their own by incorporating them into their charming home.

The night I arrived, my friends prepared a beautiful dinner for us, including chips and salsa (served in the las flores serving dish and dip bowl) and a delicious gazpacho, which we ate in blue and white mugs, by Ceramiche Bartoloni.

The relaxed blue and white pattern on these Italian mugs was the perfect compliment for the bright orange soup. The main course was slow-roasted pork tacos, which were absolutely delicious. In fact, they were so good all the guests wanted the recipe. Turns out, it’s from an amazing blog I’ve just now discovered, The Amateur Gourmet. You have got to try these tacos… and I can personally attest to the fact that they look and taste their best when served on Emilia Ceramics!

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Celebrate Our 4th Anniversary with 15% Off!

I can’t believe it’s been four years since I started Emilia Ceramics. I began by carrying handmade ceramics from just a few artists like Gorky Gonzalez and Tuscia d’Arte and now am proud to work with eleven artists from France, Italy, Mexico, and yes, Spain (coming this fall).

It couldn’t have happened without fantastic customers like you. That’s why this month we’re celebrating with discounts – but you’ll need to work for it (though not too hard, I promise).

Simply send us a photo (or a few photos) of the Emilia Ceramics you already own, in your home. Whether you’re serving dinner on one of Gorky’s plates, displaying fresh flowers in a Vazquez vase, or enjoying your morning coffee in a Bartoloni mug, we want to see it in action!

Here’s how to get your discount:

Option 1: Email us the photo(s) of your loved Emilia Ceramics in action, we’ll send you a 10% off coupon in return.

Option 2: Like us on Facebook and post your photo(s) on our wall. Then send us a private message so we can send you a thank you in the form of a 15% off coupon.

We’ll post all the photos on the Emilia Ceramics Facebook page and our Pinterest album Emilia Ceramics in Action. The best photos will also be featured on our new website, set to launch in October. And who knows, our favorite photo overall might even get a little extra something… wink, wink!

Don’t own any Emilia Ceramics yet? Don’t worry, you have until the end of August to buy that piece you’ve been lusting after, photograph it in action and send/post the photo. Then we’ll send you the coupon. No matter how you get us your photos, you can use the one-time discount through the end of 2012.

The offer ends August 31st, so get your cameras out and send us your photos now!

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My Obsession with Majolica Dinnerware, Fine Italian Ceramics, Spanish Pottery, and More!

My love of Spanish pottery and fine Italian ceramics is long-standing and one of the reasons I began Emilia Ceramics. While living in Southern Spain, I saw gorgeous pieces of pottery (plates, cups, and bowls were only the beginning) being used everyday that were just as unique as the people using them. I realized that I couldn’t use all the pieces I thought were beautiful, but knew that there were others who would love them too. And thus Emilia Ceramics came into being.

Now my collection includes fine Italian ceramics, Tuscan pottery, as well as ceramics from France and Mexico. I’m excited because it looks like I’ll be adding Spanish pottery (by Ceramica Valenciana) to the Emilia Collection by the end of the summer (crossing my fingers about how shipping times work out). All these pieces emerge from the same roots and display similar techniques — resulting in majolica dinnerware and accessories that have distinctively “fat glazes,” vibrant colors, and unique designs that vary not only from region to region, but also from artist to artist.

But while I love these new pieces being produced today, what about vintage pottery? Collectors of Quimper, Fiestaware, majolica from Deruta and Faenza, as well as other fine Italian ceramics know what I’m talking about. A friend sent me a link to some Portuguese pottery she’d found made by SECLA (this espresso cup was my favorite piece) and it got me thinking about how designs and glazes have both changed and stayed the same for all these years. Just look at these Portuguese pottery tiles, ashtrays, and vases designed by Ferreira da Silva. Most of them are from the 1950s, yet their modern lines and fun designs could come out of an artist’s studio today.

That’s one of the reasons I love all kinds of pottery – they hold timeless appeal. Fine Italian ceramics become heirlooms, whether it’s a plate or a lamp. Majolica dinnerware graces the table for decades since its sturdy construction holds up quite nicely to the rigors of daily use. Not only does Tuscan, French, Mexican, and Spanish pottery look great, it’s functional and stylish. No wonder I keep finding artists whose pieces I love to add to the Emilia Collection!

Portuguese pottery image courtesy of R.Ferrao.

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Emilia Ceramics at Gamble Garden in Palo Alto

It’s a good thing it was beautiful weather, filled with friends, and fairly successful from a business stand-point, because showcasing Emilia Ceramics at the Gamble Garden Spring Tour in Palo Alto was A LOT OF WORK! I’m talking 6 hours of set-up and another 6 hours of take-down, plus an hour each night and morning. (And not just me working all that time, but some amazing volunteers too — thanks Mom!)

Then of course there’s all the time spent selling ceramics: 5-8 on Thursday, 10-4 both Friday and Saturday. But that’s the fun part — I love showing off the beautiful vases, pitchers and bowls I’ve spent so much time collecting around the world. And getting to tell customers about the artists, the towns where they live, and my travels to pick them out. The kind of people who attend the Gamble Garden Spring Tour really appreciate the unique beauty of handmade and hand-painted ceramics. They are well-traveled and creative themselves, so they enjoy the fact that Emilia Ceramics represents independent artists in Italy, France and Mexico, crafting the highest quality ceramic ware.

The weekend was also a great way to catch up with old friends (since I grew up in Palo Alto) and make new ones, like the two women who run Art of the Garden. Their set-up was adjacent to Emilia Ceramics and it afforded us a lot of time to talk about the ups and downs of starting your own company. We traded ceramics for an “M Brace” (their patented product that enables you to build a flower bed without using any nails or hammers). Jill, who invented the M Brace, quickly fell in love with the few Sylvie pieces I have left in the collection and bought two Sylvie bowls for her daughter.

Over all, I’d say the big winner of the weekend was Richard Esteban — his rustic pitchers, cheese plates, and planters were a huge hit. I also sold lots of small, gifty items, like chicken salt and pepper shakers (never a surprise), Gorky’s long serving platters, and wine corks by Tuscia. I had to say good-bye to some of my personal favorites by Sylvie, Richard, and Ravel last weekend (because I sold them I mean) — which can seem sad until I remember they’ve just moved on to grace a new home and bring joy to those who use and love them.

So I guess it was worth the work… just as long as I don’t have to do it again for another 12 months!

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Adventures in Wedding Registries by Guest Blogger Bethany, Bride-to-Be

I’m getting married next month and it’s been quite an adventure. From finding the dress to deciding on invitations to picking a honeymoon destination (Iceland), weddings are a series of decisions that never seem to end up until the big day (and not even then!). In the midst of all this preparation are wedding registries. Do you just look at the knot.com? Pick your favorite stores? What should you even use a wedding registry for? These were all questions I had.

My fiancé Martin and I struggled with where to register for quite some time. We didn’t like the commercial feel of so many wedding-related details, particularly registries. The long list of “must have” items most big box stores present as essential to a wedding registry felt tacky and unnecessary. Since we’re both adults that live together, we already have things like towels, pots, and pans. With my huge family, however, some kind of wedding registry was needed to avoid question overload.

I’d gotten a great blue striped vase from Emilia Ceramics last year and was super excited to find out about their wedding registry option. It felt much better – we’re not people who use fine china, but do like to entertain. Working with Emily was super easy too. I got to shop online, Martin approved my choices (and added some more pieces), and soon we had a registry that was filled with unique ceramics instead of crystal and china that would just stay in boxes. With our tiny San Francisco apartment, we don’t really have room for things that we don’t actively use.

Visiting the pop-up shop in Palo Alto in January also helped with our selection process (and gave me lots of things to covet). I hadn’t realized how huge the gran taza really is or the scale of some of the vases. We also got super excited about the new French pieces with polka dots – they’re totally our style.

While we registered with two other places to give a variety of options for our friends and family around the country, working with Emily was by far the most positive experience. A certain department store (which will remain nameless) had people who said they couldn’t help us and were quite rude. Not a good first impression at all! The whole experience made us never want to go shopping again. Since then, I’ve heard a whole list of horror stories revolving around registries and am firmly convinced that where to register is just as important as other factors in the wedding (and one that carries its own particular kind of stress). My advice for anyone looking for where to register: go with places you like, keep it simple, and focus on what you really want or need (not what the sales clerks say you should have).

I’m being disciplined and not looking at what’s been purchased from any of my wedding registries, but I’m hoping to use our gorgeous new ceramics when we get back from our honeymoon next month. They’re definitely something that feels like the right way to remember such a special day.

Photos of Bethany and Martin courtesy of Quotidian Photography.

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The Wedding (and Engagement and Shower) Gift

Another May weekend, another bridal shower. This time of year it seems every weekend involves a shower, bachelorette party, or wedding celebration. Which means (for those of us not getting married), it’s the season of gift giving.

I’m not complaining — I love parties and I actually love giving gifts too. And I know someday it will be my turn and I’ll be able to register for all the juicers and waffle makers I’ve lusted over for years. But what I enjoy about giving gifts is the thought and creativity involved and more often these days, I feel uninspired when I look at a couple’s wedding registry. A metal cookie sheet or plastic cutting board does nothing to get my creative juices flowing. But that’s because I want my gift to be memorable. I want the couple to think of me when they use and enjoy it. Is that selfish? Maybe. But I’m the one giving the gift after all.

So what options do those of us creative (and yes, maybe selfish) gift givers have? For one thing, you can take an otherwise basic (read: boring) gift and make it personal.  The couple wants a fancy omelet pan? Compliment that with a fun breakfast cookbook and write a personal inscription inside the front cover.

Of course, since I started my company and now have hand-painted Italian, French, and Mexican ceramics at my disposal, most of my gifts are ceramic gifts. If the recipient isn’t registered with Emilia Ceramics, I spend some time looking at their registry lists at other stores. Once I have an idea of their color palette, I can assess what they might be missing or which of my pieces would accent the ones’ they’ve requested. Often I end up with one of the pieces shown below: A classic Italian pitcher for serving drinks or displaying flowers, an oval dish with matching dip bowls for appetizers, or a cake plate that makes a stunning statement even without a cake on top.

For cooks, I often give a spaghetti canister, utensil holder, or spoon rest. And wine lovers get a wine bottle holder with a special bottle from my favorite wine store, Brix26.

In my mind, these ceramic gifts accomplish all things a wedding (or shower, or engagement) present should. They are: (1) Special – which is fitting as a gift for friends that you presumably consider to be special too. (2) Creative/Original – there’s zero chance the couple will receive two identical gifts and be forced to return or re-gift your thoughtful present. (3) Memorable – when cooking spaghetti or serving appetizers from your gift there’s a good chance they will think of you and remember your thoughtfulness. (4) Meaningful – there’s an even better chance they will keep your gift forever as a reminder of their wedding and their happiness as a newly married couple. Which, all selfishness aside, is really the most important thing.