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Have You Seen These French Ceramics Yet?

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It’s hard for me to resist anything French. Wine, cheese, brandy, ceramics, art… the list goes on and on. Thankfully I can get my fix stateside for la vie française with events like Bar Agricole’s recent Brandyfest (Armagnac remains a favorite from my time living in Orthez), visiting with Francophone friends, and using lovely French ceramics. Have a similar love of all things French? Then check out these gems:

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French ceramic watering jugs

French watering jugs

Richard Esteban brings function and flair to the mundane task of watering. These exposed terracotta watering jugs are accented with Richard’s signature butter yellow, adding style to the next time your houseplants get a drink. These French ceramics are so lovely they’d also be fantastic on display in a garden-themed room or filled with beautiful flowers. Two sizes make for versatility.

French ceramic cheese plates

French ceramic cheese platter

In college I had a poster with all 300 cheeses of France on my wall. It was a large poster. French cheese plates are the perfect compliment to your favorite Camembert, comté, or chèvre. Use small cheese plates for two or three cheeses, medium plates for three or four, and large plates for five or more cheeses with accompanying fruit, nuts, or honey. Pair with wine for a delicious beginning or end to a meal.

French cheeses

French ceramic pitchers

Poterie Ravel’s bright, bold colors set their signature French ceramics apart from the rest. Their canary yellow pitchers beg to sit on the kitchen table throughout gray, cold months (fall and winter for most, often June and July here in San Francisco), acting like a ray of permanent sunshine. If whimsy is more your style, Sylvie Duriez’s unique French ceramics are perfect. Her animals and flowers make Provence feel like it’s right there, instead of an ocean away. I particularly love this collection of three lily pad pitchers. They’re the perfect mix of chic, charm, and functionality.

French ceramics: Sylvie

What are your favorite French things? Check out the Emilia Ceramics collection of French ceramics for more ways to bring France and Provence to your home or our France board on Pinterest if you need a mini-French vacation tout de suite.

French cheese image courtesy x1klima via Compfight cc.

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French Ceramics on the Table: Pinterest Inspirations

Rustic French ceramics invoke a country chic like none other. C’est magnifique, n’est-ce pas? I recently went on a Pinterest binge, pinning all sorts of French country tables, decorating and centerpiece ideas for special occasion, and everyday stylish French living.

French country dining room

Of course, I love supporting French ceramic artists from the prolific Richard Esteban and Poterie Ravel to the unique pieces of Sylvie Durez and Patrice Voelkel. With so many wonderful ceramics, it makes lots of sense that many French country-inspired designs feature open shelving to display pieces when not in use. This blue and white dining room is particularly striking, don’t you think?

French country blue and white dining roomFrench ceramics in country kitchen

French ceramics also mean whimsy. Take Richard’s polka dot dishes – no matter the weather outside, these polka dot bowls, mugs, plates, and pitchers are guaranteed to bring a smile to your face. The bright colors also enliven the creams, whites, and medium browns of many French country color schemes.

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French country colors

 For centerpiece ideas, a flower arrangement is classic French country. Use a pitcher vase or metal bucket for a more rustic touch.French country tableteal pitcher vase

 

And then there are French chickens and roosters, a perpetual favorite. This blue and white rooster has true vintage flair. I can see similar designs working well as wall art or even place mats.

French rooster The key to French country is accessible, beautiful tablewear and a homey, rustic vibe. The open storage for dining areas and kitchens alike allows the perfect combination of function and decoration. What are some of your favorite French country decorating inspirations? Leave a link below or check out our inspiring home decor and France boards on PInterest for even more ideas.

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New French Ceramics Have Arrived!

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IMG_4198Last week, the much anticipated French shipment was delivered to my door in Boulder! It wasn’t quite as easy as that sounds… I received about 30 large boxes that were really heavy and literally coming apart at the seams. These boxes had seen a lot. They were packed up in Provence, trucked to a loading center in Paris, then back to a French boat, where they set sail for the USA. In New York, they were put on a truck and taken to Los Angeles, where they finally got re-loaded onto a truck bound for Boulder, CO. Whew!!

Needless to say, I was thrilled that they arrived at all and pleasantly surprised to find that not one little polka-dot bowl was harmed during that extensive journey!

Since the arrival, I’ve been up to my eyebrows in polka dot ceramics. Polka dot bowls, mugs, pitchers, plates; you name it, I’ve seen it with dots. But now that the dust has settled, I’m excited to share with you a sneak peek of our new French ceramics.

Richard Esteban Pottery

This is by far the largest order I’ve ever placed with Richard. I ordered a large refreshment of our favorites, including the polka-dot bowls — which come in cereal (large), ice cream (medium), and dip bowl (small) sizes — as well as the super popular polka-dot mugs and pitchers.

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I also went a little crazy with Richard’s fun yellow plate settings. To our previous offering of polka-dot plates, songbird plates, and striped plates, we now have charming French fish, dogs, little houses, race cars, and my personal favorites, the ‘Vive L’Amour’ and ‘Vive Le Bon Vin’ rallying cries.

On top of that order, I added many pieces that I fell in love with while visiting Richard in June. Stay tuned for these new and fun additions to the collection, as I haven’t gotten them on the website quite yet!

vive_amourI love that Richard Esteban and his small team of helpers hand-crafted each of these pieces. They threw them on the wheel, loaded them carefully into the kiln (twice), and they painted them completely by hand. While unpacking these beautiful ceramic works of art I kept thinking about how much work went into them. I am so grateful to all the hard-working and super skilled Emilia Ceramics artists, who put their love and talent (not to mention a little blood and sweat, I’m sure) into this craft, all so we can better enjoy our morning coffee, ice cream snacks, and family dinners.

Get Excited…

The work I picked out on my last visit to Sylvie Duriez is just as beautiful as I remember it. I’m excited to start getting these one-of-a-kind pitchers, bowls, and plates up on the website, so keep an eye out for new additions to the Sylvie Collection.

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French Finale: Colorful Ceramics at Poterie Ravel

outsideFrom Sylvie’s workshop in Pertuis it is about a 45 minute drive south to Aubagne, where Poterie Ravel is located. Once again I was helped in my navigation by friendly little Poterie Ravel signs located at almost every turn throughout the city.

As you may remember from my previous visits, Poterie Ravel is most well-known for its large terracotta pots, which it sells to premier hotels and shopping centers around France. When you arrive at Poterie Ravel, you are greeted by lots of these sophisticated pots, displayed perfectly amidst colorful patio furniture. The old stone building covered with ivy is where this family run business has been making ceramics since 1837.

Of course they also make smaller items – like the pitchers, platters, bowls, and vases we sell at Emilia Ceramics. It is inside the old stone building that you encounter room after room of inviting and perfectly displayed ceramics in bright, festive, stylish colors. There is a warm hum from the kilns (running almost all the time) and lots of friendly workers greeting you and wanting to help. Similarly to Richard Esteban’s showroom, this is a place I could call home! On this particular visit, I spent about an hour wandering from room to room, enjoying the displays and taking lots of pictures. Finally, I picked out a number of my favorite pitchers and planting pots in bright yellow and teal green (apparently, the colors of the season).

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I was helped by this super friendly young man (above) – I can’t remember his name, sadly. He spoke some English and seemed impressed that I was from California and that I knew to come to Poterie Ravel. He said he had only been working there for a few weeks (during his school break) and that I was the first American he had met. He said it like I was a movie star, which of course made my day!

With Poterie Ravel checked off my list, I’ve completed my French shopping list… so it’s time to head to Italy! Next stop Montelupo Fiorentino, where I’ll visit Ceramiche d’Arte Tuscia and Ceramiche Bartoloni. I’m really looking forward to both… not to mention all the pasta, cappuccinos, and gelato I’ll be enjoying!

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Update on Sylvie Duriez

IMG_2233I spoke with Sylvie about a week ago, before I left home. She had never responded to my email letting her know when I’d be in France, so I was a little concerned she’d be out of town. However, she assured me over the phone that she would be there and would be expecting me. In her quiet, tentative English she added, “but I do not have much.”

This made me a little nervous. You see, among Emilia Ceramics customers there are a lot of Sylvie Duriez fans. People email and call me asking when I’m getting more of Sylvie’s ceramics. Plus, I’m a Sylvie Duriez fan and I suddenly realized I haven’t kept any of her work for myself! All of a sudden I was really worried… What if there’s nothing to buy? None of the favorite subjects we’ve all come to cherish: Whimsical women sitting under trees or staring thoughtfully out windows; Plump pink birds frolicking in fruit trees; Cats and dogs lazily laying on sofas; Bright bouquets of iris and red poppies. What will I do then?!street_corner

Well, you can all relax… After all, I wouldn’t be writing this blog post if I didn’t have good news to share about Sylvie and her beautiful ceramics!

After my stay in St. Rémy-de-Provence (and my visit with Richard Esteban), I moved on to Aix-en-Provence. Aix is a bustling university town, which actually reminds me a lot of Sevilla, Spain (where I lived a while back). Both cities seem to be in constant party-mode. The shopping streets in Aix are always teaming with beautiful, well-dressed people, and the cafés and bars are full morning, noon, and night with friends catching up over espresso, rosé or campari. Fresh fruit, vegetable, and flower markets also seem to be everywhere… everyday of the week. Needless to say, Aix is always a fun place to “have” to go : ).

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As much as I’ve come to love it, one of my favorite things about Aix is leaving it to drive the 20 minutes to Pertuis, the little town where Sylvie lives and works. It’s always a bit stressful getting out of Aix (small, one-way streets and lots of roundabouts), but then you’re suddenly out in the country, passing through grassy fields with rolling hills in the distance. This time, it was even more green and beautiful than I remembered. I’ve been to visit Sylvie at her home 3 times now, so it was easy to find. I love her house/studio… so picturesque: 48 Rue du Moulin à Huile!

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Sylvie was the same as I remember her from my previous visits — quiet and soft-spoken, yet very warm. She is much more comfortable speaking English in person than on the phone (which is totally understandable) and quickly opened up about her new plans to move her studio away from her home and experiment with new techniques. She is especially excited about the idea of working with porcelain, which will require a new kiln and different supplies.

To my relief, Sylvie had a lot of beautiful work for me to choose from. Her hesitation on the phone was mostly because she’s not sure if she’s going to continue to make the type of decorative bowls, plates, and pitchers we all know and love. As I’ve explained before, Sylvie Duriez is a true artist, striving to create original artwork. She isn’t concerned with what will sell — she wants to follow her passion. As sad as it makes me that she may not always produce the pieces I have grown so fond of, I do understand. She is so talented and it wouldn’t be the same if she was producing on command.

IMG_2228I assured Sylvie of my support for her artistic decisions and told her I’d be excited to see whatever projects she comes up with next.  Then I went to work picking out all my favorites from her current collection. As usual she acted amazed by the number of pitchers, bowls, and plates I was selecting —  but this time she didn’t complain that she’d “have so much work to do when I left” as she has said in the past. I think she was genuinely relieved to make space in her life (and on her shelves) for what’s to come. And I was more than happy to help!

I’m thrilled with the assortment of Sylvie Duriez pieces I selected to add to the Emilia Ceramics collection — as always each is completely one-of-a-kind and packed full of personality. I feel confident that none of the Sylvie fans out there will be disappointed!

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